Commensal Microbe-specific Activation of B2 Cell Subsets Contributes to Atherosclerosis Development Independently of Lipid Metabolism

Posted on Posted in AMRC Research

Date: 10 Nov 2016

 

The relation between B2 cells and commensal microbes during atherosclerosis remains largely unexplored. Here we show that under hyperlipidemic conditions intestinal microbiota resulted in recruitment and ectopic activation of B2 cells in perivascular adipose tissue, followed by an increase in circulating IgG, promoting disease development. In contrast, disruption of the intestinal microbiota by a broad-spectrum antibiotic cocktail (AVNM) led to the attenuation of atherosclerosis by suppressing B2 cells, despite the persistence of serum lipid abnormalities. Furthermore, pharmacological depletion of B2 cells with an anti-B2-cell surface CD23 antibody also attenuated commensal microbe-induced atherosclerosis. Moreover, expression analysis of TLR-signaling-related genes in the activated B2 cell subsets, assessed using the Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway RT2 Profiler PCR Array, confirmed activation of the B2-cell autoantibody-production axis, which was associated with an increased capacity of B2 cells to bind to intestinal microbiota. Together, our findings reveal the critical role of commensal microbe-specific activation of B2 cells in the development of atherogenesis through lipid metabolism-independent mechanisms.

 

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For inquiries regarding this press release

Tomoaki ISHIGAMI

E-mail: tommmish@yokohama-cu.ac.jp   Phone: +81 45 787 2635

Department of Medical Science and Cardiorenal Medicine,
Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine

Fukuura 3-9, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Japan 236-0004