Reconstruction of human elastic cartilage by a CD44+ CD90+ stem cell in the ear perichondrium

Posted on Posted in AMRC Research

Date: 09 Aug 2011

 

Professor Hideki Taniguchi, Takanori Takebe and his colleagues at Yokohama City University found that human auricular perichondrium, which can be obtained via a minimally invasive approach, harbors a unique cell population, termed cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSCs). This population displays a number of features characteristic of stem cells. Isolated human CSCs efficiently differentiated into mature chondrocytes and were shown to reconstruct large elastic cartilage after extended expansion and differentiation. The utilization of stem cells from ear will not only improve our understanding of basic cartilage biology, but will lead to novel regenerative therapies for millions of patients with craniofacial defects.

This study was published in the August, 2011 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Background and results

Despite the great demands for treating craniofacial injuries or abnormalities, effective treatments are currently lacking. One promising approach involves human elastic cartilage reconstruction using autologous stem/progenitor populations. Nevertheless, definitive evidence of the presence of stem cells in human auricular cartilage remains to be established. In this study, we identified we identified stem cells in human auricular perichondrium via a minimally invasive approach(Fig.1). Newly identified stem cells successfully reconstructed and restored human elastic cartilage after chondrogenic induction by our unique layered culture system and subcutaneous transplantation in vivo (Fig.2). Our stem cell transplantation method will provide a promising therapeutic option for the patients with currently incurable severe congenital deformities such as Treacher-Collins syndrome and Nager syndrome.


Future perspectives

We conclude that our stem cell injection method will provide a promising reconstructive material for treating craniofacial defects with successful long-term tissue restoration (Fig.3). Translation of our stem cell based approach into clinical reality may eventually revolutionize future cartilage regenerative therapies for millions of patients who have craniofacial defects. We are now preparing for realizing the first clinical application in our university hospital under cGMP grade cell production system.

 

 

For inquiries regarding this press release

Hideki Taniguchi, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Regenerative Medicine, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine
3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan
phone: +81-45-787-2621 FAX: +81-45-787-8963
E-mail:rtanigu@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp

Takanori Takebe, M.D.
Research Associate, Department of Regenerative Medicine, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine
3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan
phone: +81-45-787-2621 FAX: +81-45-787-8963
E-mail: ttakebe@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp