YOKOHAMA CITY UNIVERSITY

YCU Lectin-glycomics study team succeeds to isolate a novel lectin for glycan-based biomedical research from the feather star Oxycomanthus japonicus.

Home > Research > YCU Lectin-glycomics study team succeeds to isolate a novel lectin for glycan-based biomedical research from the feather star Oxycomanthus japonicus.
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A novel lectin (a glycan-binding protein) expected to reveal specific glycoconjugates related to pathobiological studies has been discovered through the efforts of a lectin-glycomics research team (Fig. 1) organized by Prof. Yasuhiro Ozeki, Yokohama City University, Japan. This novel lectin was purified from a marine sea animal called a feather star Oxycomanthus japonicus. (Echinodermata, Permatozoa: Crinoidea) (Fig. 2). The Japanese Association for Marine Biology (JAMBIO) in MEXT Japan has promoted these results as one of its hot research topics as part of the 2010-11 research activities of JAMBIO. The study was published online in journal of Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology by Dr. Ryo Matsumoto, Dr. S. M. Abe Kawsar (JSPS Postdoc Research fellow and Assoc. Prof. Univ. of Chittagong, Bangladesh), Dr. Yuki Fujii (Postdoc Research fellow at Univ. of Minnesota) - who completed their Ph.D programs under the supervision of Prof. Ozeki - Dr. Tomoko F. Shibata (Postdoc Research fellow, Univ. of Miami and YCU), Prof. Hiderato Yasumitsu (YCU), technical support division of Misaki Marine Biological Station (MMBS, Prof. Koji Akasaka, Director, Graduate School of the Univ. of Tokyo), Mr. Hiroaki Nakajima and Mr. Noriaki Kojima (Yokohama Science Frontier High school, Mr. Haruo Sato, Principal) and Prof. Taei Matsui and Prof. Jiharu Hamako (Fujita Health Univ.).

Crinoidea is a fascinating animal for studies on body plan and regenerative biology, even though it is evolutionally more primitive than other echinoderms. Even so, the development of Crinoidea as an experimental animal model has required many years. This it is difficult to grow and reproduce these sensitive creatures in the laboratory. Dr. Tomoko F. Shibata succeeded to establish a complete cultivation system for the feather star (O. japonicus) at MMBS of the Univ. of Tokyo at 2007. This model animal is maintained with the funding from the National BioResource Project (NBRP) of MEXT Japan.

The glycan-recognition specificity of the novel lectin was unique because it was found to bind to branched type-2 N-acetyllactosamine (Galυ1-4GlcNAc) with Neu5Acτ2-3 linkage expressed as a developmental glycol-marker (Ii antigen). This is a target glycan for bird influenza virus. However it did not recognize strictly the type-1 (Galυ1-3GlcNAc) and Neu5Acτ2-6 (Fig. 3) by using a glycomics study system called frontal affinity chromatography technology and this confirmed the highly specific nature of this lectin (Fig. 4). This marine bioresource is expected to be applicable to the development of new glycan-mediated study in life sciences.
The study was supported through Grants-in-Aid from both JAMBIO in MEXT and JSPS, and by a Scientific and Strategic Research Grant from YCU.




 

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